Posts Tagged ‘Flower’

The OSO Easy Double Red Shrub Roses Now Available

June 30th, 2014

OSO Easy Double Red Shrub Roses grows in full sun planted in moist, well drained soil. Thesmaller growing shrub rose matures in the 36 to 48 inch height and width range. Space approximately 3 feet apart for a magnificent continual blooming low hedge.

Oso Easy® Double Red Rosa ‘Meipeporia’ PPAF

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The Perfect Mix of Shade Garden Plants for Your Landscape

June 30th, 2012

shade garden can be a great place of relaxation and serenity. Sitting under the shade, you can do a lot of restful activities without sweating under the sun. Just sit under the shade and enjoy the beauty of the nature, read books, or have casual talks with family members. The uniqueness of the shade garden plants is that they flourish well in areas frequented by limited natural light. The decreased light may be of a morning sun, gloomy sun, or filtered sun. These plants require moist soil that is rich in organic matter to grow well. Ideal places to grow the shade-loving plants would be the areas where there is blocked light from tall buildings or in areas receiving diminished light due to tall trees in the surrounding area. When compared to the sun garden plants, the shade loving plants bloom well even with little care and water. They are also easy to maintain.

There are certain varieties of shade garden plants that grow for more than three years under mottled or full-shaded areas. The good thing is, as these plants flourish in the shades of the neighboring trees, they are well protected from the damage or breakage during the extreme temperatures of summer and winter. A perfect shade garden would be the one that has a blend of bright colors, arousing fragrance, nice foliage, and pervasive combination of heucheras.

Shade garden, coming along - 21 June 2012

Shade garden, coming along - 21 June 2012 (Photo credit: mmwm)

Color

By planting a cluster of perennial shade-growing plants in your garden, you can witness a steady presence of colors in your shade garden. Azalea is a colorful shade-flourishing plant that bears brightly colored flowers during the spring. The astilbe bears flowers with varying colors- red, pink, purple and white. It blooms a variety of such colors predominantly in the June and July. Bee balm is an attractive shade garden plant that bears white and red fragrant flowers starting in mid summer and lasting till the end of fall. This means, you can sit back and have an extended garden season on your landscape.

Fragrance

Two shade garden plants, the daylily and hydrangeas are well known for their fragrances. The flowers of daylily live for only a day but produces magical fragrance. Hydrangeas have green foliage and naturally scented flowers. Hydrangea blooms will vary in color according to variety selected and the pH of your soil. White blooming hydrangeas are not affected by the soil’s pH.

Foliage

Add foliage to your shade garden with an assortment of ferns. Large growing ferns such as the royal and ostrich ferns make excellent backdrop plants while the delicate lady and maidenhair ferns mix well with other plants such as hostas. Variegated hosta varieties like the patriot, revolution and Francee brighten up dark shaded garden areas.

Heuchera

A shade plant garden would certainly look incomplete without the vibrant foliage of the many evergreen heuchera varieties. The leaves can be seen in various hues- green, pink, purple and many more. Grow the North American native Heuchera plant in the shade landscape; this colorful plant won’t fail to grab the attention of any visitor that visits your shade garden.

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Greenwood’s 8 Favorite Flowering Shrubs

April 6th, 2012

Greenwood’s Favorite 8 Flowering Shrubs:     

Hydrangea macrophylla - Hortensia hydrangea, p...

Hydrangea macrophylla - Hortensia hydrangea, picture from Longwood Gardens (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

  1. The Fairy Rose
  2. Pink Velour Crape Myrtle
  3. Bloomerang Reblooming Lilac
  4. Knockout Double Pink Rose
  5. Nishiki Dappled Willow
  6. Nikko Blue Hydrangea
  7. Spilled Wine Weigela
  8. Pinky Winky Hydrangea

These flowering plants were chosen for their blooming length as well as the other special qualities that they bring to the garden. Check out our other flowering plants.

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Using Plants as Wedding Favors

October 3rd, 2011

Weddings 2011

Image by The Style PA via Flickr

With a resurgence of garden parties during spring and summer afternoons, these tips will help make your garden party even more special. Whether you present them as thank you gifts or as wedding favors, our suggestions will make you appear the thoughtful hostess.

Garden Parties, which were common during the Victorian Period, can run the gamut from a dressy afternoon tea to everyone arriving in their gardening ware to help work in the hostess’s garden. The garden party is, also, an excellent idea to bring people together for gardening clubs, a wedding shower or for the first time homeowner. Each guest brings a plant (small shrubs, ornamental grasses or other perennials) and a tool, or other piece of gardening equipment, whether new or a gift from the guests own tool shed.

For parties with gift exchanges, guests can bring items relating to gardening such as a plant, tool, container, garden ornament, etc… The hostess will need to somewhat define what types of items that guests should bring such as indoor, outdoor, flowering, non flowering, tools, etc.

One way of giving away plants as favors is to use small potted plants on the tables as all or part of the table decorations or tiny potted plants can be used as place card holders. The nursery pots can be covered with tissue paper, burlap or other fabric and tied with a colorful ribbon or twine or even repotted into inexpensive decorative or plan clay pots. Plants that work great for this are: herbs (rosemary, thyme, sage, lavender), mini palms, mini schefflera, young Shasta daisies, sunflowers seedlings, young ornamental grasses or bamboo as well as starter plants such as tomatoes.

Handing out seedlings as wedding favors has been popular for quite sometime. However, there are some considerations to keep in mind.

Seedlings are seasonal and only available November through May. During the summer months, one would need to select small potted evergreens or potted herbs.

• Plants need to be ordered 6 to 8 weeks in advance from the nursery or greenhouse so that delivery can be timed for the week before the wedding.

• Designate a person, or persons, to be responsible for separating the seedlings and bagging each one with a handful of moist peat. This needs to be done within a couple of days before the ceremony so that they are still fresh and then kept in a cool, dark area such as garage, basement or pantry.

• Where will the plants be held (at the ceremony or reception) before being handed out? It should again be a cool, dark area out of the way. Heat and sun will dry them out possibly causing the plants to wilt severely or kill them. Depending on how many guests are expected, these boxes can take up valuable space.

• The most commonly used plant varieties for handing out as favors are: pines, spruces, dogwoods, lilacs, red maples, even late spring/summer flowering bulbs.

Using plants for gifts or wedding favors is long lived. Be sure to keep in mind your guests lifestyle. If most of your guests are city dwellers residing in apartments, they are not going to have anywhere to plant most shrubs or trees, so herbs or flowers would be quite thoughtful.

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Great Uses for Shrubs in any Landscape

May 28th, 2011

Best 9 ways to use flowering shrubs and evergreen shrubs in any garden or landscape:

  • Shrubs are virtually maintenance free.
  • Our living fence shrubs and evergreen shrubs help you to maintain your privacy.
  • Several specimens of the same variety can be planted in groupings for a stronger visual effect.
  • Different varieties can be planted together for diversity and harmony of form, foliage or flower.
  • Use flowering shrubs to give a sense of volume in a flower bed and can be used to set off garden accessories such as statues, birdbaths, fountains, sculptures, and ornamental rocks.
  • Large shrubs can also be used to create an intimate corner or as a backdrop for a flowerbed.
  • Attract humming birds, bees and butterflies.
  • Use evergreen shrubs as your foundation plantings to provide year around color and texture.
  • To hide an unsightly area – select from our living fence shrubs.

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How to Design and Plant a Small Yard or Small Garden

May 15th, 2011

Design and Plant a Small Yard or Small Garden when you only have limited space for outdoor livingWhen you have a limited budget or inclination to do the landscaping projects you really should do, downsize. Downsize with smaller landscapes and smaller plants. Small yards can be used effectively to enhance bland foundations, corners, and entrances as well as add color, fragrance and interest to patios and other sitting areas.

 

Small gardens use small scale trees, shrubs and perennials. Anchoring shrubs should mature around 3 to 4 feet tall and are typically placed in the back 1/3 of the area. Planting one or two evergreen shrubs makes a good base. Colorful small flowering shrubs and shrub-like perennials are other good choices.

 

Small garden anchor plants:

 

Karley Rose, Prairie Dropseed, Karl Foerster and Adagio are some of the more striking ornamental grassesthat are attractive as single specimens and can be used in lieu shrubs as anchor plants.

 

Plant perennials of varied heights keeping within 12 to 40 inches tall for added interest. Some of the friendliest and brightest varieties are:

 

Small scale ground cover plants are the last touch for small gardens.

Select from:

 

Use spreading plants that have a spreading habit to fill in over several years such as:

 

How to plan a small sized garden for your enjoyment:

  • Select at least one small scale shrub to anchor the garden
  • Choose 3 or more perennials in varied heights
  • Use one variety of groundcover for the front most part
  • For even more interest add a butterfly house, bird house or whirligig just off the center point

For more ideas on small sized gardens, visit Greenwood Nursery.

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Affordable Hedges

February 14th, 2011

Flowering Hedge

Image by Chad Horwedel via Flickr

I have been busy putting up pages for new plants over the past week. Some of the new plants are Juncus Blue Arrows,  Mahogany Ajuga,  Creeping Raspberry and Chocolate Mint (which I suggest planting in containers). A few plants making their return to Greenwood are the Tree Form Ardens,  Tree Form Lucy, and Tree Form Lady Stanley Hardy Hibiscus.

A project that is finally complete is bringing you 3 new departments: Affordable HedgesAffordable Flowering Hedges and Affordable Elegant Hedges. This has been a collective effort with everyone here at the office to find just the right plants for these departments. They had to be easy to grow, low maintenance and provide good density for hedging. They are sold as packages of 5 plants (same variety) with a Bio-Pak Fertilizer pack for each plant to plant 25 feet of hedge.

Next week temperatures here are scheduled to be in the upper 50’s, possibly low 60’s. A couple of weeks of weather like that will cause early spring bloomers to believe spring is arriving and their buds will swell up ready to pop. This happens quite often with trees such as the flowering cherry and pear varieties. A few weeks of warm weather followed by harsh temps again can damage the buds. When this happens, the trees may only have sporadic blooming at best and then leaf out. Mid to late spring, I receive lots of emails asking why their flowering trees didn’t bloom and this is the most common reason why they don’t. Warm weather during late winter followed by freezing weather is difficult on plants. The temperature fluctuation can also cause thin barked trees and shrubs to crack or split.

If you are following the Weekly Club Specials, then you already know that for this week only all of our rose varieties can be booked for spring shipping with a 10% discount. All of our Knockout Roses, Rugosa Roses and Drift (ground cover) Roses are reduced 10% now through Thursday, February 17th at midnight. Check yourClub Page for more weekly specials over the next 3 weeks. Plant your spring and summer gardening with Weekly Club Specials.

Be sure to “Like” our Fan Page to keep informed on new plants, specials and planting news from Greenwood Nursery.

Questions? Feel free to drop me an email: Email Questions. As owner of Greenwood Nursery, I have always made myself available to our customer base to help with questions or concerns.  I’m here. Just let me know if you need any help.

Until next time…….Cheryl

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Earning My Green Thumbs

February 13th, 2011

Public Flower Garden in downtown Seattle

Image by FallenPegasus via Flickr

Post by guest blogger Cydney Langford:

I am the firstborn child of nursery owner parents. Plants, not babies. I can attest firsthand that green thumbs are born, not made. I had all the qualifications and knowledge, and yet, I can’t keep a peace lily alive for peat’s sake! (peat, as in organic humor) On the way to school most kids were quizzed on their spelling words for the day. I was quizzed on trees and shrubs that we passed along the way.  As previously stated, I had ALL the qualifications and even interest but still, houseplants browned around me. This was the norm until my first house. It had no landscaping whatsoever; a clean slate. This was my time to shine! I could show my parents and prove to myself that I was just a green thumb in waiting.

First up was the placement of beds. An herb garden was a must, as was a vegetable plot or two.  Also not to be forgotten was a cutting garden. My mom always had fresh flowers in the house and my nightstand is never without a small bouquet. It’s quite the homey touch. Now,,,, all this might seem like a daunting task for a new homeowner who hasn’t even unpacked, but I was determined. My thumb was going to be green.

Starting out, money was an object so I wanted hardy perennials and evergreens that would give me presence in the garden. For the herb plot I knew that patience was a virtue if I didn’t want to spend much money so I began with 3 in. pots. I found a great creeping Rosemary which blew me away with how fast it grew and thyme which, to my surprise, was an evergreen in my region. Two super easy starter herbs. Next was 2 varieties of lavender, lavender du Provence and lavender munstead, to which I dug the holes much bigger and added sand before planting. This reminds them of the Mediterranean of where they originated and they’ll thank you for it by growing better and faster than in clay soil. Other herbs such as oregano, chives,sage and annuals like dill, which goes to seed quickly and basil rounded it out. Quick tip: pinching off the blooms on the herbs promotes growth. That way all the energy it would have expended on the blooms gets redirected to the base plant.

For some year round color, evergreens were in order. I chose the fast growing Green Giant. These gave the perimeter of my yard a quick and easy hedge. Dwarf Sungold Cypress adds a pretty yellow green splash of color.  So, I put several of those together for a sunny grouping. My backyard is shaping up quite nicely by now.

Next up was the vegetable plot. I’ve always admired how neat and tidy raised beds look. They also give the garden an English cottage look which I love. I built my own using three 6” x 8’ boards per bed. One on each side with the third board cut in half. Then I secured them to the ground with stakes attached on the inside.  It’s so easy! I painted them white to complete the cottage look.  Our local farmer’s market has some great venders that grow organic vegetable seedlings. I ended up getting all my veggie plants there as well as some local honey and baked goodies. I love the farmer’s market! After planting all my vegetables I mulched them in with some black cow and gave a good watering. Next up, my flowers!

Now with the cutting garden, I absolutely had to have roses. I love roses! However, anything I’ve ever read about roses talks about maintenance and upkeep and fertilizing and so on, etc. Ugh! How can I develop a green thumb when all I’ll be doing is researching rose growing tips and rose trimming tips, how to cover them for the winter & snore, snore, snore! I want to have a life as well. What’s a girl to do? Dum, da, dum dum! Knockout roses to the rescue! You can’t kill these things and they look amazing! I started with two 1 gallon containers and they’ve quadrupled in size in just three years. Beautiful blossom filled bushes with the roses just begging to be put on display in my house. They’re fantastic plants. When we entertain in the summer, no one can believe that I am the one responsible for the growth of these magnificent flowers! They also ask for the name of my gardener or how often my parents “stop by”.  I just reply that it may have taken a while, but I have earned my stripes in gardening and I now am the proud owner of not one, but two green thumbs.

By guest blogger Cydney Langford

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