Posts Tagged ‘ground covers’

Organic Lawns – What Kind Do You Want?

October 13th, 2014

Author: whatsgreen

Organic Lawns – What Kind Do You Want?

About this time of year, we’ve had enough of winter and are anxious to start gardening and working on the lawn. There are lots of creative options for lawns and now is the time to start planning.

Though conventional lawns are a perfect medium where kids can play as well as provide a nice, kempt look to your landscape, to get that perfect, weed-free golf course look requires time, expense and…

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Must-Do Garden and Yard Reminders for November

November 17th, 2013

Greenwood’s Must-Do Garden and Yard Reminders for November are:

  • Drain and roll up all garden hoses
  • Cover/insulate outside faucets that are not frost proof
  • Clean and store outdoor furniture, summer lights, seasonal fountains and decorations
  • Check oil and gas in mower and other equipment – How To
  • Clean and oil (light coat) garden tools to prevent rust
  • Pull weeds so they don’t go to seed (weed seed can lie in the soil for 3 to 5 years before germinating)
  • Prune Knockout Roses (in northern climates wait for them to drop their leaves – then remove leaves from base and wrap with burlap or place protective cones over)
  • Cut back (or use a weed eater) flowering perennials including butterfly bushes
  • Place a fresh layer of mulch (shredded bark, aged compost or aged manure mix) around tender perennials and shrubs for winter insulation
  • Remove dead annuals

When you’re ready to refresh your garden plants, visit our Online Garden Center for a wide variety of perennials, ground covers, flowering and evergreen plants for your gardening projects.

English: Perennials border in Summer.

English: Perennials border in Summer. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Greenwood’s Favorite Ground Cover Plants

May 11th, 2012

Greenwood’s favorite Ground Cover Plants:

Species: Vinca major Family: ' Image No. 2

Species: Vinca major Family: ' Image No. 2 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

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How to Design and Plant a Small Yard or Small Garden

May 15th, 2011

Design and Plant a Small Yard or Small Garden when you only have limited space for outdoor livingWhen you have a limited budget or inclination to do the landscaping projects you really should do, downsize. Downsize with smaller landscapes and smaller plants. Small yards can be used effectively to enhance bland foundations, corners, and entrances as well as add color, fragrance and interest to patios and other sitting areas.

 

Small gardens use small scale trees, shrubs and perennials. Anchoring shrubs should mature around 3 to 4 feet tall and are typically placed in the back 1/3 of the area. Planting one or two evergreen shrubs makes a good base. Colorful small flowering shrubs and shrub-like perennials are other good choices.

 

Small garden anchor plants:

 

Karley Rose, Prairie Dropseed, Karl Foerster and Adagio are some of the more striking ornamental grassesthat are attractive as single specimens and can be used in lieu shrubs as anchor plants.

 

Plant perennials of varied heights keeping within 12 to 40 inches tall for added interest. Some of the friendliest and brightest varieties are:

 

Small scale ground cover plants are the last touch for small gardens.

Select from:

 

Use spreading plants that have a spreading habit to fill in over several years such as:

 

How to plan a small sized garden for your enjoyment:

  • Select at least one small scale shrub to anchor the garden
  • Choose 3 or more perennials in varied heights
  • Use one variety of groundcover for the front most part
  • For even more interest add a butterfly house, bird house or whirligig just off the center point

For more ideas on small sized gardens, visit Greenwood Nursery.

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Affordable Hedges

February 14th, 2011

Flowering Hedge

Image by Chad Horwedel via Flickr

I have been busy putting up pages for new plants over the past week. Some of the new plants are Juncus Blue Arrows,  Mahogany Ajuga,  Creeping Raspberry and Chocolate Mint (which I suggest planting in containers). A few plants making their return to Greenwood are the Tree Form Ardens,  Tree Form Lucy, and Tree Form Lady Stanley Hardy Hibiscus.

A project that is finally complete is bringing you 3 new departments: Affordable HedgesAffordable Flowering Hedges and Affordable Elegant Hedges. This has been a collective effort with everyone here at the office to find just the right plants for these departments. They had to be easy to grow, low maintenance and provide good density for hedging. They are sold as packages of 5 plants (same variety) with a Bio-Pak Fertilizer pack for each plant to plant 25 feet of hedge.

Next week temperatures here are scheduled to be in the upper 50’s, possibly low 60’s. A couple of weeks of weather like that will cause early spring bloomers to believe spring is arriving and their buds will swell up ready to pop. This happens quite often with trees such as the flowering cherry and pear varieties. A few weeks of warm weather followed by harsh temps again can damage the buds. When this happens, the trees may only have sporadic blooming at best and then leaf out. Mid to late spring, I receive lots of emails asking why their flowering trees didn’t bloom and this is the most common reason why they don’t. Warm weather during late winter followed by freezing weather is difficult on plants. The temperature fluctuation can also cause thin barked trees and shrubs to crack or split.

If you are following the Weekly Club Specials, then you already know that for this week only all of our rose varieties can be booked for spring shipping with a 10% discount. All of our Knockout Roses, Rugosa Roses and Drift (ground cover) Roses are reduced 10% now through Thursday, February 17th at midnight. Check yourClub Page for more weekly specials over the next 3 weeks. Plant your spring and summer gardening with Weekly Club Specials.

Be sure to “Like” our Fan Page to keep informed on new plants, specials and planting news from Greenwood Nursery.

Questions? Feel free to drop me an email: Email Questions. As owner of Greenwood Nursery, I have always made myself available to our customer base to help with questions or concerns.  I’m here. Just let me know if you need any help.

Until next time…….Cheryl

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Selecting Plants for Borders and Edging

October 25th, 2010


Selecting plants for bordering or edging a garden or path can be just as frustrating as accessorizing a room or an outfit. You want the overall picture to look pulled together with your choices. I like to divide plants for this purpose into two divisions: compact and spreaders. These plants grow in the 3 foot and under height range. Compact plants are just that. They will grow within a defined space only getting slightly larger over the following years. If the area needs a strong barrier, consider a low growing shrub or grass such as Hameln Grass, Spiraea Magic Carpet, Cotoneaster Coral Beauty, Hypericum Blue Velvet or the dwarf Nandina Firepower as they will work hard year round to keep the garden defined.

Spreaders and drapers will creep into the garden mixing with the other plants or spill over the edge of the garden bed. They will work well in any garden, but can really show their talents when planted along the edge of a multi level garden. Along the edge or border of a garden is a key spot to introduce additional colors and textures. If the primary color of the garden or landscape is green, for example, edge the bed with contrasting color plants such as Heuchera Plum Pudding or Black Mondo Grass. If the garden is alive with lots of color, then going low key would be more effective with something like an ornamental grass, liriope, thyme, lavender plants or dwarf boxwoods.

Here’s a listing of plants that I have complied for these 2 divisions:

Compact plants for borders and edging:

Grass Hameln, Chives, Heucheras, Aster, Hostas, Ferns-such as Autumn Brilliance, Spiraea Magic Carpet, Lavenders, City Line Hydrangeas, Liriope, Armeria Dusseldorf Pride, Veronica Royal Candles, Cotoneaster Coral Beauty, Barberry Crimson Pygmy, Hypericum Blue Velvet, Nandina Dwarf Firepower, Daylilies, Sedums, Grass Black Mondo, Grass Acorus Minimus, Grass Acorus Gramineus Ogon, Potentilla Gold Drop,

Spreaders and Drapers:

Wooly Thyme, Red Creeping Thyme, Creeping Phlox, Creeping Rosemary, Elfin Thyme, Hypericum Calycinum, Drift Roses

This listing of plants should give you many ideas of what size, colors, and type of plants you can use for edging your garden or bordering your landscape. Don’t feel limited to these varieties.

Be creative with plants. They offer so much color and texture. That’s part of the fun and the learning experience of gardening.

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The 4 Most Used Ground Cover Plants for Problem Areas

September 11th, 2010

Groundcover plants are often forgotten in garden or landscape design until a problem occurs such as erosion. Here you will learn about ground cover plant varieties that are most commonly used to solve problems in the garden and landscape.

Vinca, both vinca major and vinca minor, is one of the most versatile groundcovers. It grows in both full sun and shade. An evergreen, vinca forms a mat securely attaching to the soil. The sprouts grow, fall over and form a new root system where they touch the ground. Vinca major grows taller, in the 12 inch and up range, before falling to the ground, whereas, vinca minor is a shorter tighter grower. While either plant variety can become invasive when left to grow without any control measures, they can generally be grown within confined spaces with some maintenance.

The English Ivy and Baltic Ivy, also, grow in both sun and shaded spaces, but do require more attention when planted near foundations, as they are dedicated climbers. Their climbing causes long-term damage, whether on larger plants or buildings, so preventative measures should be taken, such as pruning some of the taller growing sprouts. With that said, ivy is a beautiful groundcover and a great choice for shaded landscape settings.

With the many varieties of pachysandra available, there is sure to be one that will work in most any situation. Pachysandra terminalis is most commonly used but the variegated and Green Sheen varieties are now becoming more widely available to offer more choices. Growing mostly in areas of partially sunny to filtered shade, pachysandra will get off to a slower start compared to vinca or ivy.

Truly underused is ground cover euonymus. Often called wintercreeper, there are many different varieties with as many different looks. Purple wintercreeper is the most common variety. The Euonymus Woolong Ghost is really interesting with its dark green leaves spiked with white veins. The Woolong Ghost is mat forming and can climb if given the opportunity. The Euonymus Kewensis offers tiny green leaves and is an excellent creeper. The Kewensis really shows its talents when planted in spaces where it can drape over such as retaining walls or rock gardens. Creeping euonymus varieties grow in full sun to partially shaded areas.

Typical spacing for ground cover plants is 12 to 18 inches apart. Bare root plants can be planted 6 to 8 inches apart for a quicker fill in.

When planting on sloped areas, use an independent sprinkler, the type that attaches to a hose. The sprinkler will need to be run until water soaks down several inches. The time for this will vary so it is best to check the soil each time it is run. How often to water will depend on local factors, but in many cases should be done every 3 to 5 days after planting for the first 6 to 8 weeks for the plants to fully establish a newer root system and begin growing. Checking the soil allows you to monitor and make the proper adjustments. If the soil is extremely dry after 3 days, you may need to water every 2 days instead. Rainfall isn’t dependable and often just runs down the surface of the ground without being absorbed into the soil.

Mulching around groundcovers can be difficult, especially on sloped areas. For sloped areas, I recommend putting down a thin layer of straw. The straw will protect the young new plants from the sun’s heat, heavy rainfall, which can wash bare root plants out of their holes and down the hill, as well as keep the soil cool and moist. Straw decomposes and helps to build up the soil. Once the plants have fully established and are beginning to grow any remaining straw can be removed and mixed into other areas of the garden or landscape.

Whether you choose vinca, ivy, pachysandra or groundcover euonymus, these groundcover plants are going to be the best choices for the job. With limited amount of care and maintenance, they are quick to establish a newer root system and begin new top growth on their way to solving your landscaping problem.

Visit with us at Greenwood Nursery. We’re here. Just let us know if you need any help.

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