Vinca Fast Growing Ground Cover For Quick Ground Coverage

The basic purpose of ground covers in hilly areas is to bind the nutrients and water in soil and prevent the soil from getting eroded. Ground covers are grown for variety of reasons which include protection from soil erosion, protection from drought as the soil soaks water for the cover plants and to improve the aesthetic appearance of the place. This is why cover plants are not only grown in gardens but also at the road sides as well as at the entrance or the unused corner of the home. There are varieties of ground covers and one of the broadleaf fast growing evergreen ground cover that grows easily and is very beautiful is Vinca.

Groundcovers are chosen by everybody because of the fact that they cover the areas which otherwise would have kept bare and dull. Vinca is one such fast growing ground cover which grows in your garden area for whole of the year. It falls into the perennial category of ground covers and are quite deep rooted plant. So before planting make sure that this is the place where you wash to grow it because it is very difficult to uproot it. Here are some of the properties of Vinca Periwinkle ground cover.

  1. ADAPTABLE TO ALL TYPES OF SOILS:This plant is adaptable to all types of soiled and therefore it is found in majority of areas. The best soil where it grows much faster is slightly acidic in nature and moist.
  2. HEIGHT: The reason why it is chosen as the groundcover is that its height barely reaches more than 4 inches which rules out the necessity of trimming them frequently.
  3. GROWING REGION: It is suitable for growing in fully sunny, semi-shaded and shaded regions as well. Periwinkle growth is most favourable in semi-shaded region. Vinca tops the list of shade loving ground covers.
  4. SPREAD: the plant is quite favourable to growth and therefore a small plant can spread to the area covering 8 feet. Thus you can grow a small plant depending upon the area where you want it to be spread. The Vinca vines keep on spreading and cover the ample area.
  5. WATER AND CARE: These plants require proper water and care. The weeds are to be removed periodically and they should be watered adequately so that they don’t dry up!

It is one such flowering ground cover which doesn’t conjure up the vision of boring green and plain foliage! The blue glittery flowers are very beautiful in sight and give a new colour to your garden. Vinca Minor is other species in this category which is best for shady regions and isgenerally grown in those areas which have poor or barren soil. But they can be used as a hedge and surround your garden space with Periwinkle blue blossoming flowers.

Vinca periwinkle ground cover is available at Greenwood Nursery Ground Covers at very reasonable price. Green wood nursery supplies potted plant as well as bare root which are packed professionally depending upon your requirement. You can book it online and it will be shipped at your doorstep within the mentioned time frame. 

Vinca Minor Best Value in Ground Cover Plants

Vinca Minor ground cover is one of the more versatile and best value invinca minor ground cover blue flowers ground cover plants. This fast growing ground cover grows in either sun or shade. The dark green evergreen leaves provide a lovely backdrop for the periwinkle blue blooms in spring. The hardy strong growing Vinca Minor is a good choice groundcover for hillsides, in shaded areas, poor soil, and other barren areas. Also referred to as creeping myrtletrailing periwinklecreeping myrtlevinca minor can be contained in specific areas by using edging. Rejuvenate old vinca ground cover plants by cutting it back by about half. Bag the clippings so that they don’t fall and root in unwelcomed areas.

 

Vinca Minor is available in 3 inch pots. Buy vinca as bare root plants and save. Our 50 plant bare root bundles are affordable garden plants. Cover more area with these discounted ground cover plants.

 

Ground Cover Basics for Erosion Control, Beautification, and Elegant Focal Points

A lot of attention is paid to beds, borders, foundations, and focal points when it comes to home and commercial gardening, but just about any landscape might benefit from well-placed ground cover plants.  A wide variety of ground cover plants are available, but a few choices deliver vivid greens, alluring colors, and hard-to-match benefits to gardens with special needs.  Among the ground covers that benefit just about every garden are:

Sedums

Vincas

Ajuga

Pachysandra

Virginia Creeper

Purple Wintercreeper

Thymes

 

The most easily recognized benefit of ground covers is their quick delivery for healthy growth in areas that often are inhospitable to other plant varieties.  Attractive, resilient, and hardy,ground covers put out runners for growth above and below the surface.  Crawling along the ground on vines, these persevering growers put out tiny root systems to ensure optimum health even in rough conditions.

Because of their root-to-runner grow style, ground cover plants make excellent heirloom pass alongs.  Most will make themselves at home in a pot of dirt with a little drink of water every day.  Just pinch a healthy offshoot, pot in healthy soil, water gently, and grow a gift for a friend.

 

Five Benefits Ground Cover Plants Offer

Other benefits of ground cover plants are not always so easily recognized, but gardeners in need are quick to point out that ground covers are excellent for:

*erosion control

*beautification of bare spots

*shady spots beneath shrubs and other sun blockers

*filling gaps between stepping stones

*creating elegant focal points throughout rock gardens

 

Where run off inhibits other types of plantings or streams and creeks eat away at banks, ground covers are helpful resources for soil stabilization.  Despite its delicate appearance, ajuga holds banks and other steep slopes together quite well.  Available in a variety of colors, ajuga adds zing to gardens with showy leaves across a delightful spectrum and stalks of flowers in spring.  Additionally, purple wintercreeper is of great benefit along slopes and banks.  Tolerant of all conditions, except swamp to marsh, purple creeper will grow from 24-60 inches a year once established.  A vining ground cover, purple creeper is known to climb as well as it crawls, creating romantic views along garden walls, streams, and rock banks.

Many conditions contribute to bare spots in otherwise verdant yards.  Lack of sun, poor soil quality, and drought might lead to brown dust spots, but one condition that is quite likely to exist within certain yards is juglone toxicity.  Certain trees such as hackberry and black walnut secret the chemical juglone that is toxic to a broad spectrum of other plants.  Rather than cutting these trees that provide a wide variety of benefits as well, simply consider which plants grow best around them.  Among the ground covers that prove quite tolerant to juglone are:

vincas

virginia creepers

ajuga

 

Quite quick to spread, vincas and ajuga produce attractive foliage and flowers, while virginia creeper presents star-like flowers along sturdy vines, creating habitat for a wide variety of wildlife.

Pachysandra terminalis is an exceptional and elegant choice for creating a sense of longevity even in newly cultivated gardens.  Growing to heights of 8-12 inches, pachysandra is ideal for filling in areas between hedges and other shrubs where other plantings may not thrive.  Preferring partial shade, pachysandra surprises where sun finds it, too.

 

Rock and Ground Cover Gardens Combine for Pollinator Safe Havens

Wherever rocks interrupt your garden, either by nature or by design, ground covers may be introduced to stunning effects.  Sedums, ajugas, and thymes are quite forgiving of the sometimes drier conditions of rock walls, and their surprising bursts of lively color are sure to delight visitors to your garden.  In fact, creating a stone/ rock garden where these ground covers thrive makes good sense for the health of your broader Eden as each attracts pollinators.  Ajuga is famed for its attraction success for hummingbirds and butterflies.  Thyme beckons bees. Sedum astounds as nearly a dozen types of butterflies hasten to it.  Your rock garden becomes a pollinator garden before your eyes.

There’s often more to ground cover than meets the eyes so wrap your garden in it with abandon.

 

How Ground Cover Plants Help to Flatten the Landscape

The process of fattening out a landscape with ground cover plants is not difficult if the proper procedures are used. For this project, various things will be needed, such as different kinds of plants depending on the season.

The Benefits Of Flattening An Area With Ground Cover Plants

When an area is sloped, water runoff and soil erosion will be an issue. In addition, the moisture retention will be uneven. A sloped landscape is also tough to mow. The bottom of the slope is usually where water will travel and stop. Because of this, plants will have growth difficulties. Plants cannot grow well in areas that have too much moisture. This is just one reason why a sloped backyard might be flatten with garden plants.

How To Flatten A Landscape

Before tackling this project, all vegetation must be removed from the sloped area. If there are any plants that are worth keeping, use a shovel to dig them up. After the plants are removed from the ground, place them in pots and water them. After the plants have enough water, place them in a location that has shade. If there are no plants worth keeping, consider buying new affordable garden plants from an online plant nursery.

All digging must be handled effectively and efficiently, so contact local utility companies to inform them about the digging locations. A representative will visit the project location to provide information about buried water pipes, power lines, and phone lines.

An entire layer of topsoil should be removed while digging. Topsoil is a dark soil, and it covers the top eight inches. This soil should be placed into a pile. Next, place the subsoil at the bottom of the slope. Place the soil in the best locations to make a slight slope. The slope should be away from any buildings in the area. Use a rake to make the surface smooth.

You will also need a lawn roller. A lawn roller is available at any hardware stores or rental companies. Use the lawn roller over the ground to compact the soil. If there are any depressions, use a shovel to fill them with more subsoil.

Use an eight-foot long two by four on the slope at the top. The board should run down the slope. Use a level on the board to ensure that the board is level. The distance from the lifted end and the ground must be measured. The grade is correct if it is two inches. Once these procedures are complete, water the area to settle the soil.

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Don’t Mow Your Lawn When Easier Lawn Alternatives are Available

This is the time of year, most of us become disillusioned with our lawns. Water, aerate, water, reseed, water, fertilize, then repeat and that doesn’t include the mowing. It’s a never ending cycle and the time has come to replace the lawn. Customers send emails wanting to know how they can forget the grass and have something that is just not as time consuming.

Well…there are lawn options and planning is a must or you will be the neighborhood poster yard for weeds. Groundcover plants, ornamental grasses and spreading perennials are popular, but there are more ways to fill in your old lawn area.

Cheryl Jones, owner of GreenwoodNursery.com notes, “This is a frequent question that I get once mowing season begins. Some of our favorite lawn substitutes are vinca, wintercreeper, pachysandra, creeping phlox, creeping thymes, mints and sedum, or stonecrop.” Jones adds, “Lawn alternatives are gaining in popularity. Homeowners would rather have color, fragrance and beauty with little work than a time consuming yard.”

More ideas for lawn substitutes are sowing wildflower seeds, small growing shrubs, ground cover roses, clover, xeriscape plants, pea gravel, heavily chipped mulch, landscape pavers, and artificial grass (don’t laugh, it is used quite often).

Visit Lawn Alternatives for more ideas on creating a garden rather than a lawn.

Greenwood Nursery, founded in 1978, is an online plant nursery and garden center that has been shipping gardening plants to the home gardener since going online in 1998. Contact Greenwood Nursery (http://www.greenwoodnursery.com/) for more information on lawn substitutes.

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Selecting and Planting Ground Cover Plants

purple wintercreeper
Image by annethelibrarian via Flickr

Ground cover plants are often forgotten in garden or landscape design until a problem occurs such as erosion. For erosion issues consider evergreen ground cover plants such as vincaivy or wintercreeper. To add color, select flowering ground covers such as creeping phloxdrift roses, or ground cover sedum.

Typical spacing for ground cover plants is 12 to 18 inches apart. Bare root plants can be planted 6 to 8 inches apart for a quicker fill in. See box below to estimate how many plants you will need.

When planting on sloped areas, use an independent sprinkler, the type that attaches to a hose. The sprinkler will need to run until water soaks down several inches. The time for this will vary so it is best to check the soil each time it is run. How often to water will depend on local factors, but in many cases can be done every 3 to 5 days after planting for the first 6 to 8 weeks for the plants to fully establish a newer root system and begin growing.

Checking the soil allows you to monitor and make the proper adjustments. If the soil is extremely dry after 3 days, you may need to water every 2 days instead. Rainfall isn’t dependable and often just runs down the surface of the ground without being absorbed into the soil.

Mulching around ground covers can be difficult, especially on sloped areas. For sloped areas, I recommend putting down a thin layer of straw. The straw will protect the young new plants from the sun’s heat, heavy rainfall, which can wash bare root plants out of their holes and down the hill, as well as keep the soil cool and moist. Straw decomposes and helps to build up the soil. Once the plants have fully established and are beginning to grow, any remaining straw can be removed and mixed into other areas of the garden or landscape.

Uses for Ground Covers:

  • Erosion control
  • Defining spaces
  • Traffic barrier
  • Transition areas
  • Small spaces
  • Where grass won’t grow

Considerations when selecting a Ground Cover:

  • Height – tall or low
  • Sun or shade
  • Clay or sandy soil
  • Moist or dry area
  • Flowering or insignificant flowering
  • Seasonal or evergreen

Use our navigation filter on the left hand side of the ground cover page to narrow down ground cover selections based on the above criteria for your needs.

 

Determining the Number of Plants Needed:

Square feet of planting area Spacing (in inches)
6 in. 8 in. 9 in. 12 in. 18 in
100 400 225 178 100 45
200 800 450 356 200 90
300 1,200 675 535 300 135
400 1,600 900 712 400 180
500 2,000 1,125 890 500 225
600 2,400 1,350 1,068 600 270
700 2,800 1,575 1,246 700 315
800 3,200 1,800 1,425 800 360
900 3,600 2,025 1,602 900 405
1,000 4,000 2,250 1,780 1,000 450

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Groundcovers to Walk on!

groundcover #6
Image by jacki-dee via Flickr

The most frequently asked question this week has been what ground covers are good for high traffic areas such as walk ways and around stepping stones. For areas like this, tough ground covers are definitely required such as:

Laurentia Blue Star Creeper is a soft tiny leafed ground cover that is a good spreader most anywhere as well as is Corsican Mint. The creeping thymes perform best in areas that are well drained and on the sandy side. Clay soil just seems to stunt their development. This works quite well especially when the path contains sand between the stepping stones or bricks.

While there are many other ground covers, such as the sedum Angelina orvinca, that are tough, yet they are not soft for stepping on with bare feet. Low growing, creeping ground covers with tight tiny leaves seem to work best and grow thicker.

Need more plant ideas? Check out our Landscaping Ideas Department. I have broken down plants by their many different uses such as Allergy Free LandscapesAccent PlantsBorder PlantsDeer Resistant PlantsNook and Cranny PlantsRock GardensShade GardensWater GardensXeriscape Landscapes and, don’t forget, Landscape Design 101 with home/landscape maintenance help.

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Drift Roses

New from the Knockout Rose Family, are the Drift Roses. Drift Roses are gorgeous compact growing groundcover-like roses with miniature roses that will bloom continually from early spring to frost. Like their Knockout Relatives, the Drift Roses are tough, disease resistant and cold hardy as far north as zone 5.

They are sure to become a favorite for any type border. Prune back to 4″ in early spring (after the last hard frost) for best performance. Regular deadheading encourages re-blooming and helps maintain a tidy appearance.

Currently, we are booking our Drift Roses for shipping this spring. Click here to book your Red Drift Roses and Apricot Drift Roses.

P. Allen Smith talks about Drift Roses in a recent newsletter. It’s a good short article on these new landscape plants. For more information visit P. Allen Smith on Drift Roses

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