Posts Tagged ‘Home’

The OSO Easy Double Red Shrub Roses Now Available

June 30th, 2014

OSO Easy Double Red Shrub Roses grows in full sun planted in moist, well drained soil. Thesmaller growing shrub rose matures in the 36 to 48 inch height and width range. Space approximately 3 feet apart for a magnificent continual blooming low hedge.

Oso Easy® Double Red Rosa ‘Meipeporia’ PPAF

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Butterfly Habitat Rain Gardens Are Combinations for Learning and Global Improvement

June 10th, 2014

In the age of social media and keywords turned catch phrase, those of us who garden and those who hope to garden and those who are only mildly garden curious hear/read about a lot of gardens.  There are Zen gardens, tranquility gardens, lasagna gardens, pizza gardens, native habitat gardens, memory gardens, rain gardens, and butterfly gardens, just to name a few.  In any given region and climate, though, there is tremendous possibility for combining the roles of more than one garden. Three of the easiest gardens to combine are butterfly, habitat, and rain gardens.  And making such a combination is easy enough that kids quite often do it by nature as they love to choose bold blooms, bright colors, interesting textures, and plants representing history and culture.

The purpose of each of these gardens might seem obvious enough from the name, but understanding the role each plays in your community, state, even the world provides a context for both children and adults.  Using the opportunity to educate through gardens, every green enthusiast stands to make global improvements.  Let’s call it the Butterfly Garden Effect that every positive motion, even the tiniest swoop of a fluttering wing, contributes to the evolution of a better world for all of us, from the most sentient creatures on the planet to the tiniest contributors.

 

The Role of Butterfly Gardens

Butterfly gardens contribute three very basic benefits:

*support for local and migrating butterflies

*beautification for communities

*attraction for a broad range of pollinators and other wildlife

Wherever butterflies flutter by, expect to find a wide range of other pollinators, beneficial insects, and birds.  It’s the circle of life, as they say, that makes butterfly gardens so crucial to ecosystems.  Attracted to color, flavor, fragrance, and texture in your garden, butterflies flit from bloom to bloom, pollinating your garden as they do.  Vivid and eye-catching they, in turn, attract a wide variety of prey that belong in your garden, too.  Every garden that attracts butterflies benefits from their careful grooming of blooms and the role they play in attracting others who tend, pollinate, fertilize, and de-bug the garden.

 

The Role of Habitat Gardens

By nature of the fact that they attract a wide variety of wildlife, butterfly gardens easily double as habitat gardens whenever shrubs and/or trees are incorporated into the design.  Essentially, habitat gardens are homes for various insects and animals.  Habitat gardens provide:

*shelter

*food

*water

*protection

*solace

to various creatures, including humans who cultivate them as places of rest and tranquility.

 

The Role of Rain Gardens

True to name, rain gardens take advantage of storm runoff to irrigate gardens, but there is a lot more going on beneath the surface.  Designed to take advantage of rainwater runoff, rain gardens also:

* direct water to low spots

*slow water to negate the possibility of erosion

*percolate runoff to promote filtering/cleaning of polluted water

*assist in drainage to minimize standing water zones

*guide filtered water to bodies such as streams, creeks, rivers, lakes and ponds, and even seas and oceans

To ensure the success and longevity of such your rain garden, incorporate native and noninvasive plants that are up to the task of handling the microclimate forming there.  Rain gardens present two main extremes in irrigation: deep wet and extreme dry, from time to time.  Native plants that are tolerant of both wet and dry conditions are your best bet.  Choosing plants of various root structures, too, will help the garden to do its best filtration work, too. Among the underground portions that help filter minerals, debris, particulate matter, and pollutants are:

* shallow, webby roots that filter tiniest particles

* bulbs, rhizomes, and cormers (combinations) that hinder larger matter passage

* deep, even tap, roots, that channel runoff to deeper soils and layers

 

Combining Roles for Your Own Butterfly Habitat Rain Garden

Cultivating a garden that achieves all three purposes is as easy as selecting plants that serve the purpose of each garden style whenever possible.  Native plants that provide blooms for adult butterflies and/or act as hosts for their caterpillar offspring may be blended with shrubs and trees that provide shelter for the other wildlife who will come to admire and consume the butterflies.  In many cases, shrubs and trees may act as nectar suppliers and/or hosts for butterfly populations as well.  Among the native shrubs and trees you might choose for your butterfly habitat rain garden are:

spicebush shrubs

butterfly bushes

*chokeberry

*serviceberry bushes

*redbud trees

Each of these shrub and trees offers much to any garden as they are fragrant, beautiful, and excellent hosts for a variety of animals and bugs.  Use these as focal points or boundaries to control entry and exit from your garden.

Layering these core contributors with a wide variety of blooming plants and attractive sedges/grasses will create a zone of comfort and peace for insects, animals, and humans alike.  So long as the plants you choose are tolerant of the water sure to come through your garden and the dry conditions that occur once runoff has been directed away, the plant combinations are endless.

Meanwhile, every time children are included in the choices you make for your home or school garden, new ideas percolate to grow for amazing results.

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Create Unique Patterns with Common Flowering Shrubs

June 2nd, 2014

You can create unique patterns with common flowering shrubs!

Your garden sends a message about who you are and what you care about. Have you ever seen those well-manicured hedges at famous locations like Versailles? These send a message of nobility, royalty and attention-to-detail. Do you want to create unique patterns with common flowering shrubs to make a good first impression?

Geometric Shapes Words or Animal Landscaping Designs

Before a neighbor or business client enters your home, he or she will see the designs of your landscaping. What messages are you sending to the neighborhood? Make geometric shapes, words or animal designs in your yard with your children to express family creativity.

Planting a tree for the birth of a child is a special commemoration. Each year, your family could get together and plan the garden pattern for the next year. You could make words, shapes or other unique patterns with flowering shrubs. The possibilities are endless.

Choosing the Right Plants for Your Yard

An online plant nursery offers great affordable garden plants along with tips from other home gardeners. Sharing your experiences can increase your gardening knowledge. Here are some of the factors for selecting the perfect plant:

  • Climate
  • Season
  • Soil
  • Sun
  • Watering
  • Owner preferences

There is a natural progression of simple to complex garden plants. Those who want an “easy-to-maintain” yard might select evergreens, bushes and shrubs. Ground cover is a great way to fill that bald spot. A combination of perennials and annuals is the next step. The ideal is to have gardens blooming through each season.

Flowering All Year Long

While a plant “may look beautiful,” it might not be ideal for your yard environment. An online plant nursery can show you plants that grow well in different geographical locations. As you read the free newsletter, you can learn about things like pest control.

Professional gardeners might create different patterns for spring, summer and fall that overlap in the same space. For example, if you use flowering shrubs that bloom in the spring, you could make a square shape with them. Then, add some summer-blooming garden plants in a circle within the square.

Find affordable flowering shrub garden plants for the home gardener to enliven your yard. Beautiful flowers will attract insects, bees, animals and humans who will all want to enjoy your beautiful garden. The proper landscaping will transfer a boring home and yard into an exciting home and wilderness environment.

 

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Starting a Backyard Garden with Raised Beds and Pots

May 28th, 2014

You can start a backyard garden with raised beds or pots. Home gardening is the number one hobby in the United States.  Is there anything more satisfying than walking out your back door, picking a juicy red tomato and enjoying that sweet fresh flavor? It is a rare treat and for most of the country it is only something we get to experience in July, August and September, but it sure is worth it.  When you go to the grocery store in the dead of winter and the tomato package says, “Vine Ripened and Tastes like Summer”, don’t you believe it!

There is nothing quite like producing your own fresh food and it is very easy to do.  No matter what size your backyard may be, or even if you just have a patio or deck, you have room for a garden by building raised beds, pots, window boxes, or just about anything that will hold soil. raised beds in backyard

First, you must decide how much space and time you may want to devote to your new project.  Like most new endeavors, starting small is a good idea, and as you learn from experience you can grow and grow from one season to the next.  If all you have is a patio or deck, you should consider what we call “container gardening”.  This is nothing more than something like a five gallon bucket or maybe a whiskey barrel or maybe a used wheelbarrow.  Even an old bathtub would do the trick!  Just fill them with clean composted soil and you are ready to plant.

If you have a little more space, raised beds are the way to go. These are constructed with organic pressure treated lumber and range in size from four feet wide, one foot deep and to as long as you would like (10 to 12 feet is most common).  It is important to limit the width because you must be able to reach the center of the bed without stepping on the soil.  If you are going to use raised beds, it is a good idea to put pencil to paper and figure out how large an area you are going to work with and how many beds you want to build.

Because your garden is new, this will be your best chance to fill it with clean weed free soil. If you are just doing container gardening, you can purchase bagged soil at any nursery or garden center.  For raised beds, you will need to have soil or loam delivered by a local landscape service or mulch supplier.  You will need approximately 3/4 of a cubic yard for each 4×12 foot bed.  Make sure you specify composted loam for vegetable gardens.  Upon delivery, mix in a small amount of peat moss to lighten up the soil, about 5%. Fill up your containers or beds and you are ready to plant. Raised bed gardens

Herbs are quite easy to grow and don’t require much space, which makes them  ideal for     container gardens.  Select whatever varieties you commonly use such as dill, thyme, parsley, chives, sage, oregano, etc. Many herbs are perennials, meaning they will grow back year after year without replanting every season.  Chives are wonderful because a small bed will come back to life early in the spring and require very little  maintenance.  Many herbs that you plant in containers can be overwintered inside and returned to the patio the following spring.

Regarding vegetables, tomatoes are an obvious choice along with cucumbers, lettuce and peppers. These four items alone will provide you with salads all season long.  Green beans are very popular too and with staggered planting, you will be able to harvest them for several weeks in a row.  Onions grow very well throughout the United States and should be planted as “sets”.  These are just immature onions about 4 inches tall that have been commercially grown for transplanting to home gardens early in the spring.

Farmers Markets will have many varieties of plants to put in your new garden.  Plant whatever you like, but let’s get going.  Spring is here and it’s time to get dirty! You will find a great selection of herbs and some perennial vegetables such as asparagus and rhubarb at Greenwood Nursery (www.greenwoodnursery.com). Place your order as early as late winter for shipping at the right time for your area.

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How Ground Cover Plants Help to Flatten the Landscape

May 7th, 2014

The process of fattening out a landscape with ground cover plants is not difficult if the proper procedures are used. For this project, various things will be needed, such as different kinds of plants depending on the season.

The Benefits Of Flattening An Area With Ground Cover Plants

When an area is sloped, water runoff and soil erosion will be an issue. In addition, the moisture retention will be uneven. A sloped landscape is also tough to mow. The bottom of the slope is usually where water will travel and stop. Because of this, plants will have growth difficulties. Plants cannot grow well in areas that have too much moisture. This is just one reason why a sloped backyard might be flatten with garden plants.

How To Flatten A Landscape

Before tackling this project, all vegetation must be removed from the sloped area. If there are any plants that are worth keeping, use a shovel to dig them up. After the plants are removed from the ground, place them in pots and water them. After the plants have enough water, place them in a location that has shade. If there are no plants worth keeping, consider buying new affordable garden plants from an online plant nursery.

All digging must be handled effectively and efficiently, so contact local utility companies to inform them about the digging locations. A representative will visit the project location to provide information about buried water pipes, power lines, and phone lines.

An entire layer of topsoil should be removed while digging. Topsoil is a dark soil, and it covers the top eight inches. This soil should be placed into a pile. Next, place the subsoil at the bottom of the slope. Place the soil in the best locations to make a slight slope. The slope should be away from any buildings in the area. Use a rake to make the surface smooth.

You will also need a lawn roller. A lawn roller is available at any hardware stores or rental companies. Use the lawn roller over the ground to compact the soil. If there are any depressions, use a shovel to fill them with more subsoil.

Use an eight-foot long two by four on the slope at the top. The board should run down the slope. Use a level on the board to ensure that the board is level. The distance from the lifted end and the ground must be measured. The grade is correct if it is two inches. Once these procedures are complete, water the area to settle the soil.

Proper landscaping knowledge is very value. We want our readers to learn something new. Sign up for our free newsletter to receive weekly gardening tips and landscaping ideas.

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What are some of the best garden plants to eat?

April 28th, 2014

Which are The Best Garden Plants To Eat? Creating a garden is a reflection of your unique style and personality. If you enjoy preparing foods with fresh ingredients, you might want to think about incorporating affordable garden plants to eat into your landscape. Planning a garden that includes edible plants can add interest and provide pleasure to your senses, and they can help you make delicious summer recipes to share with family and friends.

 

Sugar Mountain Kalinka Haskap

For a different garden plant treat, establish the Sugar Mountain Kalinka Haskap and the Sugar Mountain Blue Haskap as a set in your garden because the one pollinates the other. Grow Haskap flowering shrubs in full sun with plenty of water in well-drained soil, At maturity, these five to six foot plants, produce one-inch sweet summer berries that are a wonderful addition to frozen desserts, jams, wines, or just eating as a fresh or frozen fruit.

 

Nanking Cherry

A nice flowering and fruit-bearing shrub is the Nanking Cherry. It grows six to eight feet tall and about as wide, and the sweet-tart cherries are delicious used in pies and jams. This shrub is hearty, grows well in sun to partial shade, and will tolerate dry, sub-zero winter temperatures very well. The wildlife in your region will enjoy eating the fruit too.

 

Mint

There are several varieties of fragrant and tasty mint for the garden. You may want to use them for container gardening because frankly, mint needs to be contained or it may take over. However, if you are looking for ground cover plants, any of the mints will work. Try some of the newer varieties such as Pineapple Mint, Chocolate Mint, and Apple Mint, or there is always the old favorite, Blue Balsam Peppermint. They all smell delightful and each has a different look. Mints pair beautifully in fruit dishes and summer drinks. If you are looking to feed the butterflies and bees, several mints bloom mid to late summer and make perfect plants to eat nectar.

 

There are many edible garden herb plants and small growing fruit plants at our online plant nursery. We invite you to signup for our gardening newsletter and updates, and please feel free to browse our site. You will find lots of information and the perfect edible plants to grow among your already flowering shrubs and ornamentals. If you are landscaping a new garden, we have everything you need to succeed. We are always happy to answer any questions, and we are just an email or phone call away.

Affordable Garden Plants

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Don’t Mow Your Lawn When Easier Lawn Alternatives are Available

April 12th, 2014

This is the time of year, most of us become disillusioned with our lawns. Water, aerate, water, reseed, water, fertilize, then repeat and that doesn’t include the mowing. It’s a never ending cycle and the time has come to replace the lawn. Customers send emails wanting to know how they can forget the grass and have something that is just not as time consuming.

Well…there are lawn options and planning is a must or you will be the neighborhood poster yard for weeds. Groundcover plants, ornamental grasses and spreading perennials are popular, but there are more ways to fill in your old lawn area.

Cheryl Jones, owner of GreenwoodNursery.com notes, “This is a frequent question that I get once mowing season begins. Some of our favorite lawn substitutes are vinca, wintercreeper, pachysandra, creeping phlox, creeping thymes, mints and sedum, or stonecrop.” Jones adds, “Lawn alternatives are gaining in popularity. Homeowners would rather have color, fragrance and beauty with little work than a time consuming yard.”

More ideas for lawn substitutes are sowing wildflower seeds, small growing shrubs, ground cover roses, clover, xeriscape plants, pea gravel, heavily chipped mulch, landscape pavers, and artificial grass (don’t laugh, it is used quite often).

Visit Lawn Alternatives for more ideas on creating a garden rather than a lawn.

Greenwood Nursery, founded in 1978, is an online plant nursery and garden center that has been shipping gardening plants to the home gardener since going online in 1998. Contact Greenwood Nursery (http://www.greenwoodnursery.com/) for more information on lawn substitutes.

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8 Reasons Why You Should Have a Container Garden

April 7th, 2014

Even if you don’t have a generous room for gardening plants, you can certainly grow a container garden. You can make your patio look green and fresh with beautiful potted plants. Also, the tiniest porch at your place can vaunt with beautiful hanging basket of pretty flowers or a crop of vegetables.

8 reasons encouraging the practice of container gardening:

Gardening plants in pots are easy –

For those who are a freshman in gardening field, a container garden is one good way to create a jump-start. A small soil potted plant with seed or plant is all what is required and even a complete beginner can create an impressive container garden in very little time.

 

  •  An economical way to adding green to areas –

The best thing about gardening plants using containers is that, you can make use anything from a cement pot to old bucket. You will be surprised to see that you can transform a plastic bin, old bucket into beautiful potted plants with a little effort.

 

  • Not restricted to just the Garden area –

Even the smallest space can be enhanced by a container garden by effectively fighting the space limitations. Well, even the sun restrictions can be solved:

  • Too much sun – make a beautiful sun filled garden by filling a basket with succulents.
  • Shade only – make a container garden with potting varied colors of shade loving plants in a Terra Cotta plant.

 

  • The kids love it –

Though kids often don’t appreciate the beauty of greenery as an adult mind would but they certainly enjoy its presence. Here’s an activity, you want your kids to develop a habit of eating vegetables, try a container garden for them.

 

  • Change your geography –

Wanting to grow plants that are outside your geographical area? Start by planting exotic plant types. Container gardening can provide relief and help you grow a Johnny Jump-ups in Arizona or a Cactus plant in Alaska.

 

  • Kitchen Gardening –

Enjoy fresh dishes by growing herbs (perennial and annual varieties) and vegetables in containers. Plant only similar growing plants in the same containers. Most herbs don’t have the same needs as most vegetables and shouldn’t be planted in the same containers. Grow in full sun.

 

  • Instant satisfaction –

There are few things that can bring instant satisfaction as brought by potted garden plants. Planting container grown plants in your new pots creates instant gardens. You will surely feel satisfied with a remarkable and impressive looking garden.

 

  • Anything to everything –

Unlike the conventional method of gardening where you are limited to use earthen or cement pots, with container gardening you can use anything to everything to match the theme and color style of your home. Get creative with throw a ways such as old shoes, boots, pans, bags, and basically anything that will hold some soil.

 

Visit GreenwoodNursery.com for a great selection of small shrubs, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, herbs and perennial plants for your container gardening projects.

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Tips for Hiring a Home Gardener to Help You in the Garden

March 31st, 2014

Can you imagine owning a gorgeous garden? You can have a lovely place where plants, shrubs, flowers and trees fill your own backyard with beautiful scenery. Even if you don’t know how to cultivate a breathtaking garden yourself, you can hire someone who can help…a home gardener.

The Cost Of A Gardener
Many people spend weeks toiling over gorgeous greenery to make their garden a reality. If you want to spend the time and energy on your gardening efforts, this can be an investment for the future. The more you spend time on your garden, the more you’ll learn.

However, if you would rather not spend the money or the time researching and working in your yard, you can go ahead and hire a gardener to do it for you. Most gardeners will charge anywhere from $35 to $55 an hour for their services. This usually includes pruning your shrubs and your trees; purchasing and delivering plants; and planting your pots, urns and window boxes with annuals. It should also include weeding a flowerbed full of perennials, mulching and

edging your yard and designing flowerbeds for your property.

What To Look For In A Gardener
Before you hire a gardener to handle the garden plants and flowering shrubs in your yard, consider what qualifications are important to you.

Ask your neighbors if they have a gardener that they would recommend to you. Gardeners who generally have five to 10 years of experience will more than likely be great to hire for the job. It’s vital that your gardener has a great reputation. They should have positive testimonials that show their experience, professionalism and dedication to maintaining a multitude of yards in the past few years.

You also want your gardener to be punctual, reliable and honest. This is someone who will be on your property when you may not be present, so it’s important that you trust him or her. Unless you have stated otherwise, your gardener should be working with adequate tools that allow him or her to complete the job

well.

Decide What Projects You Would Like Completed
This is your time to think about what you want to do with your yard. When you hire a gardener, you can discuss what you’ve imagined would look nice for your home.

How would you like to use your yard? Are you going to be grilling outside and inviting friends over during the warm months? Would you like to put in a gazebo and decorate it with colorful flowers everywhere?

You can order from Greenwood Nursery and get affordable garden plants, ground cover plants and flowering shrubs that will embellish your backyard. Our online plant nursery is exactly what you need to transform your garden.

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Need Help with Deer Damage?

March 27th, 2014

Many homeowners are having problems with deer damage. Cities and towns are extending further into undeveloped regions and wildlife has no place to relocate. So…they begin to survive in new ways which includes eating your garden and landscape plants and deer seem to do the most damage.
Now…that being said, how can you as a homeowner control the deer damage and safely drive the deer away? Use a combination of the following tips as one won’t generally do the job.

Deer Control Tips:
  • Plant deer resistant plants
  • Deer repellents – direct repellents spray on the plants or are systemic while others are area repellents that emit a foul odor
  • Deer fencing – mesh type 6 to 7 feet tall
  • Tree shelters – use those at least 48 inches tall
  •  Homemade remedies
To read the complete article on controlling deer,click here.

 

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