Posts Tagged ‘Ornamental grass’

Yard Chores for September

September 6th, 2013

As the summer transitions into fall, there are a few important yard chores for September. This is the month to to a little outside work so that it isn’t as overwhelming  in spring. Hot summer nights give way to perfect evenings with just a hint of coolness. Plant growth will begin to slow, but they will continue to grow. Follow these tips to keep your yard in tip top shape.

 

  • Aerate your lawn (cool season grasses), overseed with ryegrass and apply second fertilizer application on cool season lawns.
  • Check and store yard and plant chemicals.
  • Order lily bulbs for October planting.
  • Start cutting back on lawn watering.
  • If you planted vegetable plants, pull them out of the ground as you remove the last of their veggies.
  • Pull out all spent annual bedding plants.
  • Dig, divide and plant bulb plants.
  • Add fresh mulch to younger trees and shrubs for winter protection.
  • Change up plants in containers and window boxes for fall and winter color.
  • As leaves start to fall, rake them up and start your compost pile.
  • There’s still time to plant perennials such as hostas, heucheras, ornamental grasses, ground covers, herbs, and all container grown plants.
  • Great time to do a soil test for future gardening projects so you know where your soil is on its nutrient values.
  • Start planning on which potted plants you will bring inside as the temperatures drop.

    English: A picture of compost soil

    English: A picture of compost soil (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Ground Cover Plants and More as Lawn Substitutes

July 14th, 2011

Front yard flowers

Image by nouveaustar via Flickr

This is the time of year, most of us become disillusioned with our lawns. Water, aerate, water, reseed, water, fertilize, then repeat and that doesn’t include the mowing. It’s a never ending cycle. Customers send emails wanting to know how they can forget the grass and have something that is just not as time consuming.

Well…there are lawn options and planning is a must or you will be the neighborhood poster yard for weeds. Ground cover plants, ornamental grasses and perennials are popular, but we have more ideas.

Here are a few ideas for lawn substitutes:

  • Cutting flower garden
  • Artificial grass (don’t laugh, it is being used quite often)
  • Spreading perennials
  • Clover
  • Landscape Pavers
  • Heavily chipped mulch
  • Pea gravel

Here are more ideas with pictures should you decide to go lawnless in the future. Lawn SubstitutesMore Lawn SubstitutesEven More Lawn Substitutes.

Check out Ground Cover Plants at Greenwood Nursery.

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10 Ideas for Immediate Privacy

July 9th, 2011

Entry Gate and Decorative Privacy Fence

Image by MaureenShaughnessy via Flickr

Greenwood’s top 10 ideas for immediate outdoor privacy are:

 

  1. Strategically placed fencing section
  2. Lattice panels (especially good for corners and patios)
  3. Drape burlap or a dense fabric over temporary frames for tent like effect
  4. Trellises (don’t hesitate to wind silk vines for color and privacy)
  5. Build large sections of frames stapling screen to the backs
  6. Stack potted plants – vary their heights by placing taller pots on tables or stands
  7. Pot up tall bamboo plants for a beautiful backdrop
  8. Check out the basement or garage to see if there is anything that can be taken outside (temporarily) for an interesting barrier such as old doors, shutters, screens, etc.
  9. Visit your local salvage store to look around – inexpensive sections of outdoor siding, for example, can be secured and painted for a great privacy divider
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Color in The Summer Landscape

May 26th, 2011

Spread color throughout the growing season with the right perennials. So many of the shrubs and trees that we use as foundation plants and the rest of our landscaping are limiting in providing the spectacular colors we crave during the growing season. But…you can spice it up with summer blooming perennials. With a little planning, your landscape can provide continual punches of color all the way up to frost.

 

The plants that provide the ‘best bang for the buck’ are those that begin blooming in late spring or early summer and continue on to fall or frost. You will find this in plants such as:

 

Colorful long period summer bloomers are:

 

Perennials that put on their color show only during late summer to frost are found in such plants as:

 

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Selecting Plants for Borders and Edging

October 25th, 2010


Selecting plants for bordering or edging a garden or path can be just as frustrating as accessorizing a room or an outfit. You want the overall picture to look pulled together with your choices. I like to divide plants for this purpose into two divisions: compact and spreaders. These plants grow in the 3 foot and under height range. Compact plants are just that. They will grow within a defined space only getting slightly larger over the following years. If the area needs a strong barrier, consider a low growing shrub or grass such as Hameln Grass, Spiraea Magic Carpet, Cotoneaster Coral Beauty, Hypericum Blue Velvet or the dwarf Nandina Firepower as they will work hard year round to keep the garden defined.

Spreaders and drapers will creep into the garden mixing with the other plants or spill over the edge of the garden bed. They will work well in any garden, but can really show their talents when planted along the edge of a multi level garden. Along the edge or border of a garden is a key spot to introduce additional colors and textures. If the primary color of the garden or landscape is green, for example, edge the bed with contrasting color plants such as Heuchera Plum Pudding or Black Mondo Grass. If the garden is alive with lots of color, then going low key would be more effective with something like an ornamental grass, liriope, thyme, lavender plants or dwarf boxwoods.

Here’s a listing of plants that I have complied for these 2 divisions:

Compact plants for borders and edging:

Grass Hameln, Chives, Heucheras, Aster, Hostas, Ferns-such as Autumn Brilliance, Spiraea Magic Carpet, Lavenders, City Line Hydrangeas, Liriope, Armeria Dusseldorf Pride, Veronica Royal Candles, Cotoneaster Coral Beauty, Barberry Crimson Pygmy, Hypericum Blue Velvet, Nandina Dwarf Firepower, Daylilies, Sedums, Grass Black Mondo, Grass Acorus Minimus, Grass Acorus Gramineus Ogon, Potentilla Gold Drop,

Spreaders and Drapers:

Wooly Thyme, Red Creeping Thyme, Creeping Phlox, Creeping Rosemary, Elfin Thyme, Hypericum Calycinum, Drift Roses

This listing of plants should give you many ideas of what size, colors, and type of plants you can use for edging your garden or bordering your landscape. Don’t feel limited to these varieties.

Be creative with plants. They offer so much color and texture. That’s part of the fun and the learning experience of gardening.

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Bringing Balance to Your Garden

May 17th, 2010

Bringing the four elements to the garden can open up many avenues into
oneself. Just as Feng shui corrects the positive and negative influences of
interior placement, incorporating the elements of Fire, Water, Air and Earth
can bring balance and peace to the garden.

The first element of Fire, representing the South, opens the flow of chi to
the head, neck, shoulder and arms. Its color is commonly red and can be
found in the fire from a fire pit or candles, Knockout Double Red Roses,
Japanese Red Maple, Weigela Wine and Roses, Echinacea Tomato Soup,
Gaillardia Burgundy, Monarda Fire Ball, Pineapple Sage, Arctic Fire Dogwood,
Nishiki Willow and the Cotoneaster Coral Beauty. Presence of Fire in the
garden can increase Productivity.

The second element of Water, representing the West, opens the flow of chi to
the abdomen and human emotion. Its color is commonly blue which can be
applied to a water fountain, bird bath, blue reflection ball, Russian Sage,
Nikko Blue Hydrangea, English Country Aster, Veronica Royal Candles,
Hibiscus Blue Satin and Hibiscus Blue Chiffon. The presence of Water brings
Serenity.

The third element of Air, representing the East, opens the flow of chi to
the chest and lungs. Although yellow is the color commonly used, air can
also be found through the use of whirligigs, wind chimes, windsocks and
fragrant plants such as Lavender, Lemon Thyme, Rosemary Arp, and Mock
Orange. Yellow can be found in the plants Lilium Painted Pixie, Yarrow
Moonshine, Forsythia, Sungold Cypress, Knockout Sunny Roses, Angelina Sedum,
Echinacea Mac-n-Cheese, and Black-Eyed Susans. The presence of Air in the
garden brings Happiness.

The fourth element of Earth, representing the North, opens the flow of chi
to the feet, legs and lower abdomen. Earth is green; the color of nature,
but can also be found in objects taken from Earth such as rocks/stone for a
path or wood from a fallen tree might be used to build a bench. Green can be
found in plants such as Heuchera Lime Ricky, Ornamental Grasses, Hostas,
Ferns, Spartan Juniper, Emerald Green Arborvitae and Boxwood Wintergreen.
Build Confidence with Earth in the garden.

The fifth element, and most forgotten, is Akasha. This element will open the
flow of chi to the human aura and the brain. Akasha, the center of the
universe, is the only element that we can’t see, feel, smell or touch. It is
energy or inner spirit. The colors of white and/or purple are the associated
colors for Akasha. Center your garden with Mock Orange, Hibiscus Violet
Satin, Hydrangea Incrediball, Anemone, Shasta Daisy, Echinacea White Swan,
Black Knight Buddleia, Old Fashion Lilac, Persian Lilac, Hibiscus Diana,
Hibiscus Morning Star, White Profusion Buddleia, Viburnum Japanese Snowball
and Lavender. Akasha in the garden creates harmony with the mind, body and
spirit.

Yes, I do have Russian sage in the Western area of my garden, Moonshine
Yarrow in the East, ornamental grasses in the North, Japanese Red Maple in
the South along with Mock Orange for Akasha and those are just the
beginning. Maybe that is why Steve and I feel so centered when we retreat to
our garden.

Whether you get your compass out and place the elements to their
corresponding colors and directions or just include these colors within your
garden or landscape, you can still reap the benefits of their presence. To
keep the positive/negative balance, place at least one corresponding plant
in each of the corresponding elements direction. This will allow the
elements to work together in unity.

Other ways to make your garden magical is to bring in plants that provide
fragrance and plants whose leaves or blooms will reflect the moonlight.
Fragrant plants will include: Lavender, Rosemary, Lemon Thyme, Oregano,
Spice Bush, Roses, Mock Orange, Old Fashion Lilac, Persian Lilac and
Sweetbay Magnolia. Plants whose leaves or blooms will reflect moonlight will
include: Variegated Solomon’s Seal, Burgundy Lace Fern, Limelight Hydrangea,
Incrediball Hydrangea, Russian Sage, Pink Muhly Ornamental Grass, Pee Gee
Hydrangea, Heuchera Mystic Angel, Fire & Ice Hosta, Patriot Hosta, and the
Nishiki Willow.

Check out our full line of trees, shrubs, perennials, ornamental grasses, herbs and groundcovers: Greenwood Nursery. We’re here. Just let us know if you need any help.

Visit us on YouTube. You will learn the basics of planting
container grown plants and tips for planting lavender and other herbs.
Greenwood Nursery Videos

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